Malacca a day of sightseeing Wednesday 20th February (and rest 21st February)

After a luxurious night of sleep, the bed here is the most comfortable we have slept in for a long time, it was breakfast time. Our breakfasts are included in the price here, they were served over the road in their other property, it was a nice “american” style cereal, toast, jam, tea, coffee, etc.

The old and the modern

Inside the hotel

Ready to face the day we put on our walking shoes (well our only pair of shoes really) and followed a heritage walking trail we downloaded from a tourist information site into Google maps.

It passed right in front of our hotel, we were off.

First to the top of Jonkor Walk, the most famous street in Malacca, home to many small shops and restaurants, all very traditional. More at Wikipedia https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jonker_Walk. Along here we visited the Hang Kasturi Mausoleum one of five warriors favoured by the Sultan circa 1460. More here Link. The Cheng Hoon Teng Buddhist temple was next built in 1673 making it the oldest in Malaysia. More at Wikipedia https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cheng_Hoon_Teng.

Jonker Street

Mausoleum

Buddhist temple

From here we made our way over the Malacca River bridge to see Christ Church an 18th century Anglican church, more at Wikipedia https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christ_Church_(Melaka) a Queen Victoria monument and the very colourful “rickshaw cyclists” where they will take you around the city for RM40 an hour.

Interesting sign by the river

The British are everywhere

A short climb up the central hill got us to St Paul’s Church, built in 1521 by the Portuguese. Then in 1641 the Dutch conquered and used until Christ Church was built (above). Then the British came in 1824 using it as a fort / storage area. More information on Wikipedia https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Paul’s_Church_(Melaka)

St Paul’s

The inside of St Paul’s

British fortifications

Down from here we took a break in one of two huge air conditioned shopping malls before a walk through a small park and up to the Sultan’s Palace, a modern reconstruction of the original palace built in the 1400’s now a museum. More information on Wikipedia https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malacca_Sultanate Then it was back to the river and eventually our hotel.

The park

Sultan’s residence

Inside the residence

proper days sightseeing, Malacca has a lot of history as a major trading port. Malay then Portuguese then Dutch then British.

This is a series of circular holes through walls

The following day was a day for planning our remaining time in Malaysia, not too far to go now.

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